The Prevalence of Corona Mortis in North-Eastern Thai Fresh Cadavers and the Safety Zone for Herniorrhaphy

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Somchai Ruangwannasak
Parichat Prachaney
Pipatpong Kanla
Wilaiwan Mothong

Abstract

Background and Objective: Corona mortis is a collateral circulation between the external and internal iliac system. This anatomical variant plays an important role in clinical and surgical procedure since it may cause life threatening during hernia repairs or other surgical procedures of the pubis and acetabulum. Several studies reported the incidence of corona mortis and its distance to symphysis pubis, however, little information regarding the distance from this anatomical variant to pubic tubercle, important landmark for a herniorrhaphy incision area. This study aimed to investigate the incidence of corona mortis and its distance to pubic tubercle in North-eastern Thais fresh cadavers.


Methods: Twenty North-eastern Thais fresh cadavers, 40 hemipelvises were dissected to explore arterial and venous corona mortis or both. The distance between corona mortis and pubic tubercle was measured.


Results: Arterial-venous or both corona mortis were present 60%.  The incidence of corona mortis in male (75% of 28 hemipelvises) was greater than those in female (25 % of 12 hemipelvises). The prevalence side of corona mortis was equally found. Subsequently, the distance from corona mortis to the pubic tubercle was ranged from 2.21-4.50 cm.


Conclusion: In conclusion, the high prevalence of corona mortis in fresh Thai cadavers was demonstrated. We could suggest that the safety zone for an incision area in open herniorrhaphy could be less than 2.21 cm from pubic tubercle.

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