THE EFFECT OF GENDER AND PERSONALITY DIFFERENCES IN YOUNG ADULTS ON THE EMOTIONAL AROUSAL OF THAI TEXTS AND PICTURES: EVENT-RELATED POTENTIAL STUDY

  • Suttatip Jupjaimok Burapha University
  • Seree Chadcham College of Research Methodology and Cognitive Science, Burapha University
  • Pratchaya Kaewkaen College of Research Methodology and Cognitive Science, Burapha University
  • Parinya Ruengtip College of Research Methodology and Cognitive Science, Burapha University
Keywords: Emotional Arousal, Thai Text, Picture, Event-related Potential

Abstract

According to the previous research, receiving various types of emotional stimuli contributes to changes in human brain function. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to design experimental
tasks for young adults to look at arousing Thai texts and pictures which can potentially stimulate
emotional arousal while looking at Thai texts and pictures. The participants were chosen from 80
students at Burapha University in the academic year 2017. The instruments used in this research
consist of the experimental activity of looking at Thai texts and pictures which can potentially
stimulate emotional arousal and brainwave recorder to collect corresponding brain wave data
(P100, N200, N400, and P600). The data were analyzed by Two-way ANOVA. The research results
show that, while looking at Thai texts and pictures that arouse emotion in calmness characteristics,
there are differences in the emotional amplitude of P100, N200 and N400 in brainwaves among male and female young adults. In excitement characteristics, male and female young adults were
characterized by amplitude differences in brain waves N200, N400 and P600. With regards to open
and average personality, it was found that calmness characteristic amplitude differs in waves N200,
and excitement was characterized by amplitude differences in waves N200, N400 and P600. The
findings of this research indicate that Thai texts and pictures that arouse emotion lead to varying
effects to human brain based on gender and personality.

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Published
2020-01-22
Section
บทความวิจัย (Research Article)