Herbs Used of Thai Traditional Healers for Menopause Treatment in Nakhon Si Thammarat Province

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Winyu Wongwiwat
Chadaporn Kleangchan
Wasan hayeeyahya
Kanyarat Chaimo
Kempapat Masariyanana
Tiptida Kongmanee
Warunrat Rattanakho
Pirinya Kritwongngam Kritwongngam

Abstract

The purpose was to document and analyze herbs used of Thai traditional healers for menopause treatment in Nakhon Si Thammarat province. Research methods contained purposive sampling, semi – structure interview and analyzed in form of lectures, 4 Thai traditional healers were conducted. Result founded total of 68 herbs, consist of 65 medicinal plants, belonging to 34 families, 1 animal herb and 2 mineral herbs. Total of 34 Families of medicinal plants, belonging to 53 genera, the most dominant family was Zingiberaceae for 12 percent (8 species). The most part used was root and rhizome for 29 percent
(19 species). Total of 9 taste of herbs revealed from 10 taste of Thai traditional pharmaceutical theory, the most taste of herbs was pungent for 31 percent (21 species). The most consensused species by 3 Thai traditional healers were Atractylodes lancea (Thung) Dc., Cyperus rotundus L., Piper chaba Hunt, Plumbago indica L. and Salacia chinensis L.. Knowledge of 4 Thai traditional healers signified their wisdom for menopause treatment harmonized with Thai traditional medicine and pharmaceutics. These database can be utilized for next recipe development for menopause. Additionally, these database can be alternative way for elderly woman who wants to make self-take care. Knowledge of 4 Thai traditional healers were inherited from the ancestors which based on Thai traditional medicine theory.


 

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How to Cite
Wongwiwat, W. ., Kleangchan, C. ., hayeeyahya, W. ., Chaimo, K. ., Masariyanana, K. ., Kongmanee, T. ., Rattanakho, W. ., & Kritwongngam, P. K. (2020). Herbs Used of Thai Traditional Healers for Menopause Treatment in Nakhon Si Thammarat Province. Ramkhamhaeng Research Journal of Sciences and Technology, 23(2), 11–20. Retrieved from https://li01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/rusci/article/view/248492
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Articles
Author Biographies

Winyu Wongwiwat, Corresponding author: Thai Traditional Medicine Department, Faculty of Science and Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Srivijaya.

Corresponding author: Thai Traditional Medicine Department, Faculty of Science and Technology, Rajamangala University of   Technology Srivijaya.

Chadaporn Kleangchan, Thai Traditional Medicine Department, Faculty of Science and Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Srivijaya.

Thai Traditional Medicine Department, Faculty of Science and Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Srivijaya.

Wasan hayeeyahya, Thai Traditional Medicine Department, Faculty of Science and Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Srivijaya.

Thai Traditional Medicine Department, Faculty of Science and Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Srivijaya.

Kanyarat Chaimo, Thai Traditional Medicine Department, Faculty of Science and Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Srivijaya.

Thai Traditional Medicine Department, Faculty of Science and Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Srivijaya.

Kempapat Masariyanana, Thai Traditional Medicine Department, Faculty of Science and Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Srivijaya

Thai Traditional Medicine Department, Faculty of Science and Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Srivijaya

Tiptida Kongmanee, Thai Traditional Medicine Department, Faculty of Science and Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Srivijaya

Thai Traditional Medicine Department, Faculty of Science and Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Srivijaya

Warunrat Rattanakho, Thai Traditional Medicine Department, Faculty of Science and Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Srivijaya.

Thai Traditional Medicine Department, Faculty of Science and Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Srivijaya

Pirinya Kritwongngam Kritwongngam, Food Technology Program, Faculty of Agricultural Technology, Phuket Rajabhat University.

Food Technology Program, Faculty of Agricultural Technology, Phuket Rajabhat University.

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