Equation Model For Postmortem Interval Assessment From Ambient Temperature, Total Body Score And Time Since Death

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Warachate Khobjai
Pongpitsanu Pakdeenarong

Abstract

Ambient temperatures factor affects the post-mortem changes. Forensic physicians canestimate the time of death by primarily examining post-mortem changes to the corpse. The objective of this research was to investigate the relationship of cumulative temperature change to total body score and mortality time of corpses. The results of the study can be used as a model for estimating mortality time in tropical Thailand. This research was a qualitative and documentary research based on secondary data. The study examined the relationship of cumulative temperature to the change in the total body score of the corpses and the time of death, based on a 48 total body change score. The results of the study of time after death, the low-mid-high margin postmortem

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Research article
Author Biographies

Warachate Khobjai, Silpakorn University

Forensic science and criminal justice program, Faculty of science

Pongpitsanu Pakdeenarong, Silpakorn University

Forensic science and criminal justice program, Faculty of science

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