The Potential of Biosurfactant from Pomelo Peel Fermentation for Bacterial Inhibition

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Chanika saenge Chooklin
Wanvipa Chaichan
Paweena Dikit

Abstract

The objective of this research was to investigate the production and properties of biosurfactant from fermented pomelo peel waste with water in 4 ratio 1:1, 2:1, 3:1, and 4:1 respectively for 3 months. The result showed that the emulsion ability (EA) of pomelo peel waste with water in the ratio of 1: 1 had the highest emulsion value up to 51.64 percent. Therefore, the ratio 1: 1 was chosen to compare the methods of biosurfactant harvesting with various extraction methods. It was found that the extraction of biological surfactants with chloroform: methanol (2: 1) and the crude extraction of biosurfactant at 0.45 grams per liter. Biosurfactant has the ability to reduce surfactants in the pH range 4-10 of temperature between 25-121 degrees Celsius and sodium chloride salt concentration range from 0-12 percent by weight. The concentration range of magnesium chloride was 0-0.1 percent by weight and that of calcium chloride was 0-0.4 percent by weight. For the bacterial inhibition, the MIC (Minimal Inhibitory Concentration) of E. coli Salmonella sp. S. aureus and B. cereus was 25 25 6.25 and 1.56 milligrams per milliliter, respectively and the MBC (Minimal Bactericidal Concentration) value was 50 milligrams per milliliter.

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How to Cite
Chooklin ฌ. . แ., Chaichan ว., & Dikit ป. (2021). The Potential of Biosurfactant from Pomelo Peel Fermentation for Bacterial Inhibition. Rajamangala University of Technology Srivijaya Research Journal, 13(3), 704–716. Retrieved from https://li01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/rmutsvrj/article/view/241537
Section
Research Article
Author Biographies

Chanika saenge Chooklin, Faculty of Science and Fisheries Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Srivijaya

Faculty of Science and Fisheries Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Srivijaya, Trang Campus, Sikao, Trang 92150,  Thailand.

Wanvipa Chaichan, Faculty of Science and Fisheries Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Srivijaya

Faculty of Science and Fisheries Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Srivijaya, Trang Campus, Sikao, Trang 92150,  Thailand.

Paweena Dikit, Faculty of Science and Technology, Songkhla Rajabhat University

Faculty of Science and Technology, Songkhla Rajabhat University, Muang, Songkhla 90000, Thailand.

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