Risk factors associated with environmental mastitis in clinical cases at small dairies in western Thailand

Authors

  • Wantida Horpiencharoen Section of Epidemiology, Department of Veterinary Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kasetsart University, Kamphaeng Saen, Nakhon Pathom 73140, Thailand.
  • Sukanya Thongratsakul Section of Epidemiology, Department of Veterinary Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kasetsart University, Kamphaeng Saen, Nakhon Pathom 73140, Thailand.
  • Chaithep Poolkhet Section of Epidemiology, Department of Veterinary Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kasetsart University, Kamphaeng Saen, Nakhon Pathom 73140, Thailand.

Keywords:

Bovine mastitis, Dairy cattle, Risk factors

Abstract

The risk factors were identified associated with the environmental and non-environmental pathogens that cause bovine clinical mastitis. A cross-sectional study using a questionnaire was conducted from September 2013 to July 2014 to identify the risk factors associated with different types of bacteria. The study area consisted of the regions served by the Kasetsart University Veterinary Teaching Hospital. A questionnaire was given to farmers, and milk was collected from 110 cows in 37 small dairies in western Thailand. The results showed that environmental pathogens were the most frequently isolated type of pathogen (76.36%). The analysis of potential risk factors indicated that unpracticed hand stripping after machine milking (odds ratio (OR) = 0.26; p < 0.05) and cleaning the udders of several cows using the same towel (OR = 0.18; p < 0.05) were significantly associated with the occurrence of environmental bacterial mastitis. Furthermore, environmental pathogens presented risk factors associated with this milking practice. Farmers and the relevant authorities should apply this information to control the incidence of clinical mastitis.

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Published

2020-04-24

Issue

Section

Research Article