Dehydration of Pomelo (Citrus grandis) Albedo and Its Utilization As a Source of Dietary Fiber in Philippine Pork Sausage

Authors

  • Angelica Bianca P. Soriao Department of Food Technology, College of Education, University of Santo Tomas, Manila 1015, the Philippines
  • Airannegale G. Dale Department of Food Technology, College of Education, University of Santo Tomas, Manila 1015, the Philippines
  • Charles Gilroy M. Dela Cruz Department of Food Technology, College of Education, University of Santo Tomas, Manila 1015, the Philippines
  • Patrisha Coleen K. Indiongco Department of Food Technology, College of Education, University of Santo Tomas, Manila 1015, the Philippines
  • Jose Lorenzo M. Manucom Department of Food Technology, College of Education, University of Santo Tomas, Manila 1015, the Philippines
  • Jon Nikole M. Masangcay Department of Food Technology, College of Education, University of Santo Tomas, Manila 1015, the Philippines
  • Juan Alexis R. Mañago Department of Food Technology, College of Education, University of Santo Tomas, Manila 1015, the Philippines
  • Monalisa B. Narvaez Department of Food Technology, College of Education, University of Santo Tomas, Manila 1015, the Philippines

Keywords:

Pomelo Albedo, fiber, pork sausag

Abstract

Albedo from pomelo fruits was dehydrated and utilized as a potential source of dietary fiber in Philippine pork sausage, a popular Filipino meat product. Both raw and debittered albedo were dehydrated (2 hr, 60 °C) and pulverized to prepare dehydrated raw albedo (DRA) and dehydrated debittered albedo (DDA). DRA and DDA were characterized in terms of drying kinetics, drying qualities (bulk density, water activity and coefficient of reconstitution) and proximate composition. The functional properties (water holding, swelling, gelation, solubility, fat binding and emulsifying capacities) of DRA and DDA were determined and compared to bulking and binding ingredients—namely, phosphate, textured vegetable protein, isolated soy protein and carrageenan. The water holding and fat binding capacities of DDA were significantly (P < 0.05) higher than the DRA and tested ingredients. DDA was utilized in pork sausage at 3% and 6% (weight per weight) incorporation. Pork sausage with 3% DDA was comparable (P < 0.05) to the control in terms of aroma, flavor and tenderness and was acceptable to consumers. The cooking characteristics of pork sausage with 3% DDA were significantly (P < 0.05) improved compared to the control. Philippine pork sausage with 3% DDA may serve as a potential source of dietary fiber with minimal changes in sensory qualities.

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Published

2015-08-31

Issue

Section

Research Article